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OSHA 10hr & 30hr Training State Map

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OSHA recommends Outreach Training Program courses as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers covered by OSHA 29 CFR 1926. Workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on the specific hazards of the job. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will receive an OSHA 10-Hour Construction Outreach DOL course completion card within 6-8 weeks.

(Choose a State for OSHA Training - States in Green require OSHA Training.)
AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania|Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | Washington DC | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming

Sates Requiring OSHA Outreach Training

Some states require that OSHA 10-hour Outreach Training is mandatory for certain workers. The following states have these requirements:

  • Connecticut
    • Required for all construction workers for public building projects paid for (in part or in full) by state funding where the total cost is over $100,000.
  • Florida
    • Required for all construction employees on any Miami-Dade County public or private contract valued in excess of 1,000,000.
  • Massachusetts
    • Required for construction workers at all public sector projects.
  • Missouri
    • Required for all construction workers on public work projects (state or municipal).
  • Nevada
    • Required for all construction employees (10-hour) and supervisors (30-hour).
  • New Hampshire
    • Required for all construction workers on public works projects with a total cost over $100,000.
  • New York
    • Required for all workers on public works contracts greater than $250,000.
  • Pennsylvania
    • Required for all employees (10-hour) and at least one supervisory employee (30-hour) of licensed contractors performing permitted construction or demolition work within the city of Philadelphia.
  • Rhode Island
    • Required for all workers on municipal and state construction projects with a total cost of $100,000 or more.
  • West Virginia
    • Required for workers on any public improvement project with a total cost in excess of $500,000.

In other States, some companies require their employees to take OSHA training in order to be qualified to perform certain duties. However, whatever industry you work in - taking an OSHA Training Course is a low cost investment that rewards you with essential job safety practices that could one day possibly save your life. Most workplace accidents and injuries are preventable, so take a proactive step towards your workplace safety.

Though some states, jurisdictions, or individual employers may decide to require Outreach training or Department of Labor cards for Construction employees, it is important to understand that Outreach training does not necessarily cover all training requirements found in OSHA standards. So, each worksite and job will have additionall unique training requirements, and it is entirely the employer's responsibility to ensure that all job hazards are fully explained through training.

Types of Construction Workers

Boilermakers, Carpenters, Carpet Layers, Dredgers, Electricians, Fire Sprinkler Installers, Linemen, Elevator Mechanics, Fencers, Glaziers, Heavy Equipment Operators, Insulation Installers, Ironworkers, Laborers, Landscapers, Masons and Stonemasons, Millwrights, Painters & Decorators, Pile Drivers, Plasterers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, Sheet Metal Workers, Tile Workers, Truck Drivers and Teamsters, Waterproofers, and Welders.

Types of Construction Work

Public & Construction Engineering, Carpentry, Plasterwork, Scaffold, Construction and Concrete, Stone Work, Roof Work, Electrical Work, Piping Work, Tile, Brick and Block Work, Steel Construction Work and Reinforcement Work, Paving Work, Dredging Work, Glass Work, Interior Finishing, Machinery Installation, Landscape Gardening, Water Facilities Work, and Waste Facilities Work.

OSHA's Construction Focus Four

The leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites are referred to as OSHA’s Focus Four. They are falls, electrocution, struck by object and caught in/ between. These “Fatal Four” were responsible for nearly three out of five (56%) construction worker deaths in 2010, BLS reports. The actual breakdown of these causes of fatalities on construction sites in 2010 is as follows (numbers are a percentage of the 774 total construction-related fatalities that occurred in 2010):

  • Falls: 264 (34%);
  • Electrocutions: 76 (10%);
  • Struck by object: 64 (8%);
  • Caught in/between: 33 (4%).

To mitigate these fatality statistics, OSHA and other professional safety and health organizations, both in the private and public sectors, are targeting the contributing factors. This article summarizes essentials of OSHA’s Focus Four. Resources used to combat Focus Four incidents include outreach and training to help inform and enable employees and employers to better recognize, evaluate and control falls, electrocutions, struck by objects and caught in/between hazards on construction sites and related activities.